Call of the Weird

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Call of the Weird

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Highlights

  • 304

    Pages
  • 9780330435703

    ISBN
  • 129 mm

    Width
  • 198 mm

    Height
  • 321 gram

    Weight
  • NEW

    Edition
  • PAPERBACK

    Binding
  • 7 JULY 2006

    Publish Date
  • 32 mm

    Spine Width

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    Description

    Call of the Weird Paperback , 290 pages Published 2006 by Pan (first published September 1st 2005)

    About the Author

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    Louis Theroux

    Louis (Sebastian) Theroux was born in Singapore in 1970. His father, the American novelist and travel writer, , met his mother, who worked for the V.S.O., in Uganda. Louis’ older brother was born in Kampala, so as children we sort of globe trotted. But his father decided to buy a family home in England, and they settled down in a big, rambling, dilapidated house in Wandsworth, South London. Louis went to Westminster School and then gained a First Class Degree in History at Oxford University.

    On graduating, Louis decided to spend some time in the States. His summer break got longer and longer. I didn’t have a job lined up in England and I felt that at least by being in America I was broadening my mind. Marcel had just completed a post-graduate degree at Yale, so Louis stayed with him. I did menial work to make money and spent two months with a glass blower who made unbelievably tasteless gilded cherub goblets.

    Although initially resisting the idea of going into journalism. All my friends were writing, and I wanted to be different. Louis found a job on a local paper in the sprawling city of San Jose, a town where nothing ever happens. A year later he went to work for the New York-based satirical magazine, Spy, where When I asked some rappers to freestyle on gun safety, one of them threatened to beat me up.

    As a correspondent for Michael Moore’s 1995 series, TV Nation, Louis anchored sixteen segments. Theroux describes his first assignment: The Klu Klux Klan were trying desperately hard to repackage themselves and make themselves seem cuddly and nice, but inevitably they left out racist stickers or hate filled T-shirts. It was quite an eye opener. Reports on Avon Ladies in the Amazon and on President Clinton’s hometown of Hope, Arkansas followed.

    In 1995, Louis developed his own Weird Weekends and produced a critically acclaimed documentary series premiere. As Theroux describes, Weird Weekends se

    Rating & Reviews

    3.7

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