Underworld

Supplemental materials are not guaranteed for used textbooks or rentals (access codes, DVDs, CDs, workbooks).

Underworld

Author:

Availability: In Stock

While Eisenstein documented the forces of totalitarianism and Stalinism upon the faces of the Russian peoples, DeLillo offers a stunning, at times overwhelming, document of the twin forces of the Cold War and American culture, compelling that swerve from evenness in which he finds events and people both wondrous and horrifying. Underworld opens with a breathlessly gracefu While Eisenstein documented the forces of totalitarianism and Stalinism upon the faces of the Russian peoples, DeLillo offers a stunning, at times overwhelming, document of the twin forces of the Cold War and American culture, compelling that swerve from evenness in which he finds events and people both wondrous and horrifying. Underworld opens with a breathlessly graceful prologue set during the final game of the Giants-Dodgers pennant race in 1951. Written in what DeLillo calls super-omniscience the sentences sweep from young Cotter Martin as he jumps the gate to the press box, soars over the radio waves, runs out to the diamond, slides in on a fast ball, pops into the stands where J. Edgar Hoover is sitting with a drunken Jackie Gleason and a splenetic Frank Sinatra, and learns of the Soviet Unions second detonation of a nuclear bomb. Its an absolutely thrilling literary moment. When Bobby Thomson hits Brancas pitch into the outstretched hand of Cotter—the shot heard around the world—and Jackie Gleason pukes on Sinatras shoes, the events of the next few decades are set in motion, all threaded together by the baseball as it passes from hand to hand. Its all falling indelibly into the past, writes DeLillo, a past that he carefully recalls and reconstructs with acute grace. Jump from Giants Stadium to the Nevada desert in 1992, where Nick Shay, who now owns the baseball, reunites with the artist Kara Sax. They had been brief and unlikely lovers 40 years before, and it is largely through the events, spinoffs, and coincidental encounters of their pasts that DeLillo filters the Cold War experience. He believes that global events may alter how we live in the smallest ways, and as the book steps back in time to 1951, over the following 800-odd pages, we see just how those events alter lives. This reverse narrative allows the author to strip away the detritus of history and pop culture until we get to the storys pure elements: the bomb, the baseball, and the Bronx. In an epilogue as breathless and stunning as the prologue, DeLillo fast-forwards to a near future in which ruthless capitalism, the Internet, and a new, hushed faith have replaced the Cold Wars blend of dread and euphoria. Through fragments and interlaced stories—including those of highway killers, artists, celebrities, conspiracists, gangsters, nuns, and sundry others—DeLillo creates a fragile web of connected experience, a communal Zeitgeist that encompasses the messy whole of five decades of American life, wonderfully distilled.


To get best offers, download Bookchor App

Download App now

Seller: BookChor
Dispatch Time : 1-3 working days
While Eisenstein documented the forces of totalitarianism and Stalinism upon the faces of the Russian peoples, DeLillo offers a stunning, at times overwhelming, document of the twin forces of the Cold War and American culture, compelling that swerve from evenness in which he finds events and people both wondrous and horrifying. Underworld opens with a breathlessly gracefu While Eisenstein documented the forces of totalitarianism and Stalinism upon the faces of the Russian peoples, DeLillo offers a stunning, at times overwhelming, document of the twin forces of the Cold War and American culture, compelling that swerve from evenness in which he finds events and people both wondrous and horrifying. Underworld opens with a breathlessly graceful prologue set during the final game of the Giants-Dodgers pennant race in 1951. Written in what DeLillo calls super-omniscience the sentences sweep from young Cotter Martin as he jumps the gate to the press box, soars over the radio waves, runs out to the diamond, slides in on a fast ball, pops into the stands where J. Edgar Hoover is sitting with a drunken Jackie Gleason and a splenetic Frank Sinatra, and learns of the Soviet Unions second detonation of a nuclear bomb. Its an absolutely thrilling literary moment. When Bobby Thomson hits Brancas pitch into the outstretched hand of Cotter—the shot heard around the world—and Jackie Gleason pukes on Sinatras shoes, the events of the next few decades are set in motion, all threaded together by the baseball as it passes from hand to hand. Its all falling indelibly into the past, writes DeLillo, a past that he carefully recalls and reconstructs with acute grace. Jump from Giants Stadium to the Nevada desert in 1992, where Nick Shay, who now owns the baseball, reunites with the artist Kara Sax. They had been brief and unlikely lovers 40 years before, and it is largely through the events, spinoffs, and coincidental encounters of their pasts that DeLillo filters the Cold War experience. He believes that global events may alter how we live in the smallest ways, and as the book steps back in time to 1951, over the following 800-odd pages, we see just how those events alter lives. This reverse narrative allows the author to strip away the detritus of history and pop culture until we get to the storys pure elements: the bomb, the baseball, and the Bronx. In an epilogue as breathless and stunning as the prologue, DeLillo fast-forwards to a near future in which ruthless capitalism, the Internet, and a new, hushed faith have replaced the Cold Wars blend of dread and euphoria. Through fragments and interlaced stories—including those of highway killers, artists, celebrities, conspiracists, gangsters, nuns, and sundry others—DeLillo creates a fragile web of connected experience, a communal Zeitgeist that encompasses the messy whole of five decades of American life, wonderfully distilled.
Additional Information
Title Underworld Height 13
Don DeLillo Width 5.3
ISBN-13 9780330369954 Binding Paperback
ISBN-10 #0330369954 Spine Width
Publisher Picador USA Pages 832
Edition 2010 Availability In Stock

Goodreads reviews


Free shipping

On order over ₹399
 

Replacement

15 days easy replacement
 

0124-4561150

Customer care available