Horse Heaven

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Horse Heaven

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It takes a great deal of faith to gear a novel this horse-besotted to the general public. Horse love is one of those things either you get or you dont, and for the vast majority of the populace, horse stories tend to read like porn written for 13-year-old girls. The good news, then, is that while a love of all things equine is not a prerequisite for enjoying Jane Smileys It takes a great deal of faith to gear a novel this horse-besotted to the general public. Horse love is one of those things either you get or you dont, and for the vast majority of the populace, horse stories tend to read like porn written for 13-year-old girls. The good news, then, is that while a love of all things equine is not a prerequisite for enjoying Jane Smileys Horse Heaven , a love of human perversity is. Racing, after all, is at worst a dangerous, asset-devouring folly and at best an anachronism, as one of her horse trainers notes: The Industry Leaders had made it their personal mission to bring horse racing to the attention of the general public, with the NFL as their model and television as their medium of choice, which was fine with Farley, though his own view was that horse racing out at the track, newspaper reading, still photography, placing bets in person, and writing thank-you notes by hand were all related activities, and football, ESPN, video, on-line betting, and not writing thank-you notes at all were another set of related activities. A crucial piece of information for Smiley fans is that, among her many novels, Horse Heaven most resembles Moo (and theres even a pig!). In fact, with these two books it appears that this versatile author has finally found a home in which to unpack her impressive gifts: that is, the sprawling, intricately plotted satirical novel. Her target in this case is not academia but horse racing--less commonly satirised but, here at least, just as fruitfully so. Wickedly knowing, dryly comic, the result is as much fun to read as it must have been to write. None of which means that Horse Heaven is a casual read. For starters, one practically needs a racing form to keep track of its characters, particularly when their stories begin to overlap and converge in increasingly unlikely and pleasing ways. Perhaps it says something about the novel that the easiest figures to follow are the horses themselves: loutish Epic Steam, the monster colt; the winsome filly Residual; supernaturally focused Limitless; and trembling little Froneys Sis. And thats not to forget Horse Heavens single most prepossessing character, Justa Bob--a little swaybacked, a little ewe-necked, but possessed of a fine sense of humour and an abiding disdain for winning races by anything but a nose. Then there are the humans, including but not limited to socialite Rosalind Maybrick, her husband Dick (who manufactures giant heavy metal objects in distant impoverished nation-like locations), a Zen trainer, a crooked trainer, a rapper named Ho Ho Ice Chill, an animal psychic and a futurist scholar, as well as attendant jockeys, grooms and hangers-on. (Not to mention poor, ironically named Joy, a few years out of Moo U and still having problems relating.) Its a little frustrating to watch this cast come and go and fight for Smileys attention; you glimpse them so vividly, and then they disappear for another hundred pages, and it breaks your heart. But there are certainly worse problems a novel could have than characters to whom you grow overattached. A plot this convoluted would be one, if only it werent so hard to stop reading. There are elements of magic realism, astounding coincidences, unabashed anthropomorphism. (At one point--while Justa Bob throws himself against his stall in sorrow at leaving his owners tiny, wordless mother behind--this reviewer cried, Shameless! even as she began to tear up.) Improbably, it all works. Horse Heaven is a great, joyous, big-hearted entertainment, a stakes winner by any measure, and for both horse lovers and fans of Smileys dry, character-based wit, a cause for celebration on par with winning the Triple Crown. -- Mary Park

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It takes a great deal of faith to gear a novel this horse-besotted to the general public. Horse love is one of those things either you get or you dont, and for the vast majority of the populace, horse stories tend to read like porn written for 13-year-old girls. The good news, then, is that while a love of all things equine is not a prerequisite for enjoying Jane Smileys It takes a great deal of faith to gear a novel this horse-besotted to the general public. Horse love is one of those things either you get or you dont, and for the vast majority of the populace, horse stories tend to read like porn written for 13-year-old girls. The good news, then, is that while a love of all things equine is not a prerequisite for enjoying Jane Smileys Horse Heaven , a love of human perversity is. Racing, after all, is at worst a dangerous, asset-devouring folly and at best an anachronism, as one of her horse trainers notes: The Industry Leaders had made it their personal mission to bring horse racing to the attention of the general public, with the NFL as their model and television as their medium of choice, which was fine with Farley, though his own view was that horse racing out at the track, newspaper reading, still photography, placing bets in person, and writing thank-you notes by hand were all related activities, and football, ESPN, video, on-line betting, and not writing thank-you notes at all were another set of related activities. A crucial piece of information for Smiley fans is that, among her many novels, Horse Heaven most resembles Moo (and theres even a pig!). In fact, with these two books it appears that this versatile author has finally found a home in which to unpack her impressive gifts: that is, the sprawling, intricately plotted satirical novel. Her target in this case is not academia but horse racing--less commonly satirised but, here at least, just as fruitfully so. Wickedly knowing, dryly comic, the result is as much fun to read as it must have been to write. None of which means that Horse Heaven is a casual read. For starters, one practically needs a racing form to keep track of its characters, particularly when their stories begin to overlap and converge in increasingly unlikely and pleasing ways. Perhaps it says something about the novel that the easiest figures to follow are the horses themselves: loutish Epic Steam, the monster colt; the winsome filly Residual; supernaturally focused Limitless; and trembling little Froneys Sis. And thats not to forget Horse Heavens single most prepossessing character, Justa Bob--a little swaybacked, a little ewe-necked, but possessed of a fine sense of humour and an abiding disdain for winning races by anything but a nose. Then there are the humans, including but not limited to socialite Rosalind Maybrick, her husband Dick (who manufactures giant heavy metal objects in distant impoverished nation-like locations), a Zen trainer, a crooked trainer, a rapper named Ho Ho Ice Chill, an animal psychic and a futurist scholar, as well as attendant jockeys, grooms and hangers-on. (Not to mention poor, ironically named Joy, a few years out of Moo U and still having problems relating.) Its a little frustrating to watch this cast come and go and fight for Smileys attention; you glimpse them so vividly, and then they disappear for another hundred pages, and it breaks your heart. But there are certainly worse problems a novel could have than characters to whom you grow overattached. A plot this convoluted would be one, if only it werent so hard to stop reading. There are elements of magic realism, astounding coincidences, unabashed anthropomorphism. (At one point--while Justa Bob throws himself against his stall in sorrow at leaving his owners tiny, wordless mother behind--this reviewer cried, Shameless! even as she began to tear up.) Improbably, it all works. Horse Heaven is a great, joyous, big-hearted entertainment, a stakes winner by any measure, and for both horse lovers and fans of Smileys dry, character-based wit, a cause for celebration on par with winning the Triple Crown. -- Mary Park
Additional Information
Title Horse Heaven Height 12.8
Jane Smiley Width 4.4
ISBN-13 9780571205608 Binding Paperback
ISBN-10 #0571205607 Spine Width
Publisher Faber And Faber (penguin India) Pages 720
Edition 2010 Availability Out Of Stock

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